Difference Between Regular vs Series
As adjectives the difference between regular and series is that regular is (christianity) bound by religious rule; belonging to a monastic or religious order (often as opposed to (secular)) while series is. . .

As adjectives the difference between regular and series is that regular is (christianity) bound by religious rule; belonging to a monastic or religious order (often as opposed to (secular)) while series is. . .

Difference From Regular vs Series
Regular vs Series

Difference Between Regular vs Series?


As adjectives the difference between regular and series

is that regular is (christianity) bound by religious rule; belonging to a monastic or religious order (often as opposed to (secular)) while series is (electronics) connected one after the other in a circuit.

As nouns the difference between regular and series

is that regular is a member of the british army (as opposed to a member of the territorial army or reserve) while series is a number of things that follow on one after the other or are connected one after the other.

regular

English

(wikipedia regular)

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • (Christianity) Bound by religious rule; belonging to a monastic or religious order (often as opposed to (secular)).
  • * 2002 , , The Great Nation , Penguin 2003, page 201:
  • A quarter of a million strong in 1680, the clergy was only half as large in 1789. The unpopular regular clergy were the worst affected.
  • Having a constant pattern; showing evenness of form or appearance.
  • (geometry, of a polygon) Having all sides of the same length, and all (corresponding) angles of the same size
  • (geometry, of a polyhedron) Whose faces are all congruent regular polygons, equally inclined to each other.
  • Demonstrating a consistent set of rules; showing order, evenness of operation or occurrence.
  • * 2011 , (AL Kennedy), The Guardian , 12 Apr 2011:
  • April may be the cruellest month, but I am planning to render it civilised and to take my antibiotics in a regular manner.
  • (now, rare) Well-behaved, orderly; restrained (of a lifestyle etc.).
  • Happening at constant (especially short) intervals.
  • (chiefly, US) Having the expected characteristics or appearances; normal, ordinary, standard.
  • *
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients, chapter=1 , passage=For a spell we done pretty well. Then there came a reg'lar terror of a sou'wester same as you don't get one summer in a thousand, and blowed the shanty flat and ripped about half of the weir poles out of the sand.}}
  • (chiefly, military) Permanently organised; being part of a set professional body of troops.
  • Having bowel movements or menstrual periods at constant intervals in the expected way.
  • (colloquial) Exemplary; excellent example of; utter, downright.
  • Belonging to a monastic order or community.
  • regular clergy, in distinction from the secular clergy
  • (botany, zoology) Having all the parts of the same kind alike in size and shape.
  • a regular''' flower; a '''regular sea urchin
  • (crystallography) isometric
  • (snowboarding) Riding with the left foot forward. BBC Sport, "Sochi 2014: A jargon-busting guide to the halfpipe", 11 February 2014
  • (analysis, not comparable, of a Borel measure) Such that every set in its domain is both outer regular and inner regular.
  • Synonyms

    * (with constant frequency) uniform * (normal) normal * (grammar) weak (verbs) * (frequent) steady

    Antonyms

    * (with constant frequency) irregular * (normal) irregular * (obeying rules) irregular * (grammar) irregular, strong (verbs) * (snowboarding) goofy

    Coordinate terms

    * (snowboarding) switch

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A member of the British Army (as opposed to a member of the Territorial Army or Reserve).
  • A frequent, routine visitor to an establishment.
  • Bartenders usually know their regulars by name.
  • A frequent customer, client or business partner.
  • This gentleman was one of the architect's regulars .
  • (Canada) A coffee with one cream and one sugar.
  • Anything that is normal or standard.
  • * 2011 , Jamie MacLennan, ZhaoHui Tang, Bogdan Crivat, Data Mining with Microsoft SQL Server 2008
  • You separate the marbles by color until you have four groups, but then you notice that some of the marbles are regulars , some are shooters, and some are peewees.

    References

    * * ----

    series

    English

    Noun

    (series)
  • A number of things that follow on one after the other or are connected one after the other.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=19 citation , passage=When Timothy and Julia hurried up the staircase to the bedroom floor, where a considerable commotion was taking place, Tim took Barry Leach with him. […]. The captive made no resistance and came not only quietly but in a series of eager little rushes like a timid dog on a choke chain.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-28, author=(Joris Luyendijk)
  • , volume=189, issue=3, page=21, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Our banks are out of control , passage=Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. When a series of bank failures made this impossible, there was widespread anger, leading to the public humiliation of symbolic figures.}}
  • (US, Canada) A television or radio program which consists of several episodes that are broadcast in regular intervals
  • Friends was one of the most successful television series in recent years.
  • (British) A group of episodes of a television or radio program broadcast in regular intervals with a long break between each group, usually with one year between the beginning of each.
  • (mathematics) The sum of the terms of a sequence.
  • (cricket, baseball) A group of matches between two sides, with the aim being to win more matches than the opposition.
  • (zoology) An unranked taxon.
  • (senseid) A subdivision of a genus, a taxonomic rank below that of section (and subsection) but above that of species.
  • Usage notes

    * In the United Kingdom, television and radio programs (spelt in Commonwealth English as "programmes") are divided into series, which are usually a year long. In North America, the word "series" is a synonym of "program", and programs are divided into year-long seasons. * (mathematics) Beginning students often confuse (term) with (sequence).

    Synonyms

    * (number of things that follow on one after the other) chain, line, sequence, stream, succession * (television or radio program) show, program

    Derived terms

    * (media, TV) TV series * (mathematics) arithmetic series, basic hypergeometric series, confluent hypergeometric series, formal power series, geometric series, hypergeometric series, power series

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (electronics) Connected one after the other in a circuit.
  • You have to connect the lights in series for them to work properly .

    Antonyms

    * parallel

    What is the difference between Regular and Series

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