Difference Between Mate vs Tup
As nouns the difference between mate and tup is that mate is a fellow, comrade, colleague, partner or someone with whom something is shared, eg shipmate, classmate or mate can be (chess) short for checkmate or mate can be , an aromatic tea-like drink prepared from the holly yerba maté ((taxlink)) while tup is. . .

As nouns the difference between mate and tup is that mate is a fellow, comrade, colleague, partner or someone with whom something is shared, eg shipmate, classmate or mate can be (chess) short for checkmate or mate can be , an aromatic tea-like drink prepared from the holly yerba maté ((taxlink)) while tup is. . .

Difference From Mate vs Tup
Mate vs Tup

Difference Between Mate vs Tup?


As nouns the difference between mate and tup

is that mate is a fellow, comrade, colleague, partner or someone with whom something is shared, eg shipmate, classmate or mate can be (chess) short for checkmate or mate can be , an aromatic tea-like drink prepared from the holly yerba maté ((taxlink)) while tup is a male sheep, a ram or tup can be two pence.

As verbs the difference between mate and tup

is that mate is to match, fit together without space between or mate can be to win a game of chess by putting the opponent in checkmate while tup is to mate; used of a ram mating with a ewe.

mate

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl) ). More at (l), (l).

Noun

(en noun)
  • A fellow, comrade, colleague, partner or someone with whom something is shared, e.g. shipmate, classmate.
  • (especially of a non-human animal) A breeding partner.
  • (colloquial, British, Australia, New Zealand) A friend, usually of the same sex.
  • I'm going to the pub with a few mates .
    He's my best mate .
  • (colloquial, British, Australia, New Zealand) a colloquial "sir"; an informal and friendly term of address to a stranger, usually male
  • Excuse me, mate , have you got the time?
  • (nautical) In naval ranks, a non-commissioned officer or his subordinate (e.g. (w, Boatswain's Mate), (w, Gunner's Mate), Sailmaker's Mate, etc).
  • (nautical) A ship's officer, subordinate to the master on a commercial ship.
  • (nautical) A first mate.
  • A technical assistant in certain trades (e.g. gasfitter's mate'', ''plumber's mate ); sometimes an apprentice.
  • The other member of a matched pair of objects.
  • ''I found one of the socks I wanted to wear, but I couldn't find its mate .
  • A suitable companion; a match; an equal.
  • * Milton
  • Ye knew me once no mate / For you; there sitting where you durst not soar.
    Synonyms
    (checksyns) * fellow * friend * buddy * sir * partner * See also
    Derived terms
    (Derived terms) * bedmate * bunkmate * cellmate * classmate * crewmate * flatmate * floormate * housemate * mateship * office mate * roommate * shipmate * teammate * tourmate * workmate

    Verb

  • To match, fit together without space between.
  • The pieces of the puzzle mate perfectly.
  • To copulate.
  • To pair in order to raise offspring
  • To arrange in matched pairs.
  • To introduce (animals) together for the purpose of breeding.
  • To marry; to match (a person).
  • * Shakespeare
  • If she be mated with an equal husband.
  • To match oneself against; to oppose as equal; to compete with.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • There is no passion in the mind of man so weak but it mates and masters the fear of death.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I, / Dare mate a sounder man than Surrey can be.
  • To fit (objects) together without space between.
  • (aerospace) To move (a space shuttle orbiter) onto the back of an aircraft that can carry it.
  • Synonyms
    (checksyns) * couple * match * pair
    Antonyms
    * (aerospace) demate
    Derived terms
    * mating

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) verb maten, (etyl) mater, from (etyl) noun .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (chess) Short for checkmate.
  • Verb

  • To win a game of chess by putting the opponent in checkmate
  • To confuse; to confound.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Etymology 3

    See

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • ).
  • The abovementioned plant; the leaves and shoots used for the tea
  • Anagrams

    * * * * ----

    tup

    English

    (wikipedia tup)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) tupe, origin unknown.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A male sheep, a ram.
  • * 1790 [http://books.google.com/books?id=orhMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA222&dq=%22a%20tup%20in%20an%20halter%22#v=onepage&q=%22a%20tup%20in%20an%20halter%22&f=false]
  • ... to tie up rams, which could not be supposed to much used to handling ... having often heard for a proverb, as mad as a tup in an halter
  • The head of a hammer, and particularly of a steam-driven hammer.
  • * (rfdate) [http://www.topforge.co.uk/Magazines/Hammer2.htm]
  • Those familiar with drop forging are accustomed to sizing drop hammers as 1 ton or 5 ton or whatever. This measure of the size is simply the weight of the tup . The total weight of the helve of No 2 is about 6.4 tons.
  • * (rfdate) [http://www.key-to-steel.com/Articles/Art168.htm]
  • This is the modern equivalent of smith forging where the limited force of the blacksmith has been replaced by the mechanical or steam hammer. The process can be carried out by open forging where the hammer is replaced by a tup and the metal is manipulated manually on an anvil.
  • * (rfdate) [http://www.steelcorp.com/term.htm]
  • Rockwell hardness test: A method of measuring hardness. The hardness is expressed as a number related to the depth of the residual penetration. A test for determining the hardness of a material based on the depth of penetration of a specified penetrator in to the specimen under certain arbitrarily fixed condition of test. A hardness test where the loss in kinetic energy of a falling diamond tipped metal ‘tup ’, absorbed by indentation upon impact of the tup on the metal being tested is indicated by the height of rebound.
    Synonyms
    * (male sheep) ram

    Verb

    (tupp)
  • To mate; used of a ram mating with a ewe.
  • *
  • Even now, now, very now, an old black ram is tupping your white ewe.
  • * (rfdate) The Langley Chase Flock - explanation of tupping
  • Tupping is the term used for when the rams cover the ewes. For our flock, this takes place in November when the ewes naturally come into season.
  • (slang) To have sex with, to bonk, etc.
  • * 2001 , Simon Hawke, A Mystery of Errors [http://books.google.com/books?vid=ISBN0812564545&id=iu5CUMiNTUMC&pg=PA34&lpg=PA34&dq=%22tup+her%22&sig=VIxFsnbUvckFmygYjq6Shc8r9bg]
  • I love her well enough to tup her, I suppose. A dangerous bit of business, that. She is as fertile as a bloody alluvial plain.
  • * 2003 , Pierre Delattre, Woman on the Cross [http://books.google.com/books?vid=ISBN0966861256&id=oc7an025f9MC&pg=PA75&lpg=PA75&dq=%22tup+her%22&sig=rbHJq6-MuXoPp0MAdXGJ28SIGdI]
  • I was the one who convinced her you would not tup her, and that if you did you would never lie with her against her will.
  • (regional English, slang) To butt: said of a ram.
  • Synonyms
    * (to have sex with)
    References
    * 1902: Websters: - to butt. * 1986: Concise Oxford: - hammer.

    Etymology 2

    Short for .

    Noun

    (-)
  • Two pence.
  • Anagrams

    * * ----

    What is the difference between Mate and Tup

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